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3 edition of Psychosocial screening and intervention with cancer patients found in the catalog.

Psychosocial screening and intervention with cancer patients

Avery D. Weisman

Psychosocial screening and intervention with cancer patients

research report

by Avery D. Weisman

  • 225 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Project Omega, Dept. of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cancer -- Psychological aspects.,
  • Cancer -- Social aspects.,
  • Psychiatric social work.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: leaves [39]-[49] (2d group)

    StatementAvery D. Weisman, J. William Worden, and Harry J. Sobel.
    ContributionsWorden, J. William 1932- joint author., Sobel, Harry J., joint author., Project Omega.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC262 .W443
    The Physical Object
    Pagination87, [50] leaves :
    Number of Pages87
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4147822M
    LC Control Number80127130

      Both patients and caregivers have reported decreased closeness 15 and increased conflict regarding symptom management after the diagnosis. 16 To date, only a handful of randomized controlled trials of psychosocial interventions for advanced cancer patients and/or their family members have been conducted. Most have targeted families in. Background. Previous integrative literature reviews and meta-analyses have yielded conflicting results regarding the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Methods. An integrative review of the literature focused on 19 randomized, controlled trials (–) was completed to examine the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients.

    Psychosocial distress, defined as “an emotional experience of a psychological, social, and/or spiritual nature that may interfere with the ability to cope effectively with cancer, its’ symptoms and treatment,” 1 is a significant problem for cancer patients, their family members, and caregivers. Psychosocial distress ranges from normal feelings of apprehension regarding a cancer diagnosis. Psychosocial telephone interventions for patients with cancer and survivors: A systematic review Article (PDF Available) in Psycho-Oncology 24(8) October with Reads How we .

      Objective: To systematically review the effect of psychosocial interventions on improving QoL, depression and anxiety of cancer s: We conducted a systematic review of psychosocial interventions among adult cancer caregivers published from to PsycINFO, PubMed, Proquest, Cochrane Library, Embase, Applied Social Sciences Index and .   1. Introduction. As of , cancer distress screening and referral for psychosocial intervention has been mandated for continued cancer center accreditation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer,.Common concerns among cancer survivors and strategies for identifying distress have been recently cancer centers are gaining experience with screening.


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Psychosocial screening and intervention with cancer patients by Avery D. Weisman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Psychosocial screening and intervention with cancer patients: Research report Paperback – January 1, by Avery D Weisman (Author)Author: Avery D Weisman. Individual chapters of this book are available to purchase online.

In Psychosocial Interventions for Cancer contributors analyze state-of-the-art research, theory, and intervention to prevent cancer, detect it in more treatable stages, and enhance the quality of life among cancer patients Pages: Abstract Background Receiving a diagnosis of cancer and the subsequent related treatments can have a significant impact on an individual’s physical and psychosocial well‐being.

To ensure that cancer care addresses all aspects of well‐being, systematic screening for distress and supportive care needs is recommended.

Appropriate screening could help support the integration of psychosocial. Home / Ebook / Psycho-Oncology: A Quick Reference on the Psychosocial Dimensions of Cancer Psycho-Oncology: A Quick Reference on the Psychosocial Dimensions of Cancer $ Geriatric Psycho-Oncology is a comprehensive guide that provides best practice models for the management of psychological, cognitive, and social outcomes of older adults living with cancer and their families.

Chapters cover a wide range of topics including screening tools and interventions, psychiatric emergencies and disorders, physical symptom management, communication issues, and issues.

75 rows    A search for randomised controlled trials testing psychosocial. Many instruments have been developed to assess psychosocial distress and its subtypes in geriatric cancer patients. Although the clinician may not employ them often in clinical care, they do help in identifying the presence and severity of a particular symptom.

This chapter provides a guide to these instruments. The chapter is organized according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

McLachlan SA, Allenby A, Matthews J, Wirth A, Kissane D, Bishop M, Beresford J, Zalcberg J () Randomized trial of coordinated psychosocial interventions based on patient self-assessments versus standard care to improve the psychosocial functioning of patients with cancer.

J Clin Oncol 19(21)–   Through screening, the early incorporation of psychosocial and behavioral interventions in cancer treatment may be more readily accepted by patients and less stigmatizing.

13 In addition, these interventions complement cancer therapies and may enhance medical outcomes while reducing the overall costs of health care. Methods Sample. Barriers to the Delivery of Psychosocial Care. Many studies focusing on the need assessment for patients with cancer have shown that at an average of 32% of cancer patients report the need for psychosocial care [] covering a wide range of various psychosocial commonly reported needs include help with coping with anxiety, depression, and fear of recurrence or.

Introductory in nature and providing ready access to a range of evidence-based interventions, this book briefs the reader on the field of psycho-oncology and the basics of cancer, explains.

Intervention: any strategy that aimed to improve the rate of routine screening and referral for detected distress of patients with cancer. Comparison: no intervention controls, 'usual' practice or alternative interventions.

Outcome: (primary) any measure of provision of screening and/or referral for distress, (secondary) psychosocial distress. Recognized for their efficacy in improving quality of life and ameliorating distress in patients with cancer, psychosocial oncology interventions have been the subject of several meta‐analyses and systematic reviews 3, In the most recent one, Faller et al.

included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) cover patients. This. Psychological Treatment of Patients With Cancer offers a succinct but comprehensive guide to psycho-oncological practice.

Designed to build a foundation of knowledge that tackles the depth and breadth of the field, this volume includes a range of psychological interventions aimed at helping patients cope with cancer treatment. Introduction. A significant minority of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients experience clinically meaningful anxiety or depressive symptoms or reduced mental well-being that may warrant intervention [1–4].Worse mental health outcomes in CRC patients have been associated with younger age, lower socioeconomic status, increased perceptions of illness-related benefits, and poorer physical health.

Psychosocial Impact of Cancer on the Individual, Family, and Society 5 another factor (Holland, ). Holland and Wiesel () emphasized that the stigma associated with cancer diminished in the late 20th century only when patients began being told their diagnosis.

At times, families still ask that patients not be told about their diagnosis. Objectives The primary aim of the review was to determine the effectiveness of strategies to improve clinician provision of psychosocial distress screening and referral of patients with cancer.

Design Systematic review. Data sources Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Describes an intervention program for adults with melanoma, breast, or lung cancer.

patients received psychosocial evaluation and a systematic program of psychosocial rehabilitation, while   The field of psychosocial oncology is a young discipline with a rapidly expanding evidence base.

Over the past few decades, several lines of research have established that psychosocial problems, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, fatigue, sexual dysfunction, and cognitive complaints, are common and consequential in patients with cancer.

The word “distress” was chosen. Cancer is a general term used to describe a disturbance of cellular growth and refers to a group of diseases and not a single disease entity. Because cancer is a cellular disease, it can arise from any body tissue, with manifestations that result from failure.

First, studies of psychosocial interventions should be informed by the growing body of research demonstrating that cancer patients tend to experience symptoms in clusters rather than in isolation. 75 Depression, for example, frequently co‐occurs with pain, fatigue, and sleep problems in cancer patients.

76, 77 Recognizing this pattern.Psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life and emotional wellbeing for recently diagnosed cancer patients (Review) Galway K, Black A, Cantwell M, Cardwell CR, Mills M, Donnelly M. Published in The Cochrane LibraryIssue   Psychosocial Care of the Adult Cancer Patient introduces psychologists and other mental health professionals to the field of psycho-oncology, educates them about evidence-based interventions for individuals, groups, couples, and families, and describes how to successfully collaborate with oncologists and other cancer care professionals.